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High End DIY Speaker Build – Lessons Learned

As a teenager completing my summer job with most of the income available for my DIY audio hobby, I had the desire to build a 2 way high end monitor/bookshelf speaker. Having limited confidence in my own abilities, I looked for a proven high end design. A speaker design published in Speaker Builder magazine caught…

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Annex Speaker Kit Development – Crossover Design and Speaker Voicing

Crossover Design For optimal performance and accuracy in a 2+ way speaker, most crossovers will require the following networks. Level matching The sensitivities of transducers in a multi-way speaker are typically different and their levels must be matched to achieve the acoustic design goals. As you can see from the transducer frequency response measurements, the…

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Annex Speaker Kit Development – Acoustic Design Goals, Cabinet Design Considerations, Transducer Measurements

Acoustic Design Goals My acoustic design goals for the Annex speaker were as follows. smooth frequency response within the listening window with a 1dB to 2dB tilt from 100Hz to 10KHz smooth in-room mic position averaged frequency response with a 5-6dB tilt from 100Hz to 10KHz smooth sound power response with directivity rising with frequency…

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Annex Speaker Kit Development – Initial Thoughts and Transducer Selection

Initial Thoughts Another 2 way bookshelf speaker kit? Not just another. There is no shortage of speaker kits in the marketplace using this configuration. It seems to be considered the quintessential go-to kit for the new speaker builder. And that is precisely why I thought it was appropriate to begin my Make Audio journey targeting…

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Generic Passive Crossovers – Not Recommended

To achieve the textbook filtered curve you expect from generic off-the-shelf or textbook equation calculated passive crossovers, these generic implementations require a constant load impedance/resistance and assume your transducers exhibit a linear frequency response. That constant load is usually 4 or 8 ohms. A transducer’s impedance varies with frequency. We can compensate for the varying…

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